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Jack White Show Goes On Without a Hitch @ Second Radio City Show: September 30, 2012

Wow. Can you believe it? Everyone made it through the second night of Jack White‘s two-gig stint at New York City’s famed Radio City Music Hall.

No one got yelled at! No one got booed at! No one got stabbed! No one got shot! No one got called a NPR listener! An amazing, heroic job by all. I don’t want to brag, but I’m pretty sure everyone who was there will be nominated for a Nobel Peace Price. *Buffs nails on shoulder* Just sayin’. Is group Catholic sainthood even a thing? Because it should be after this show.

All kidding aside, tonight’s show went very different than last night’s 50 minute set/mini-audience riot. This one went on with no incident for about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Jack and his lady band (the Peacocks) played about an hour long regular set, went off stage for 5 mins and promptly came back to bang out another 15 minutes or so, ending the night just around 10:30pm.

As soon as Jack set foot on the stage, the audience rose to their feet and did not sit down the entire time. A clap-along began during “We’re Going to Be Friends” but slowly petered out half way. The crowd was re-energized by the hard rockin’ ditties “Freedom at 21″ and “Sixteen Saltines.”

Jack said not one word to the audience except for “Thank you” right before he and the band too their final bows. I found this a bit strange — he normally does do a little bit of banter, and almost always introduces the band — but none of that tonight. It was strictly business as they powered through the set, with gusto and precision, but lacking that special something that separates the good shows from the great shows.

When I saw Jack and the Buzzards before a few months ago at the Wiltern in LA, Jack was whizzing and whirling around the stage, sliding to his knees, jumping on top of the bass drum, and chatting every once and again to the crowd. Tonight it seemed like he was a little bit more reserved — towards the end of the set on classic jams like “Dead Leaves on the Dirty Ground” and “Ball and a Biscuit,” he would add a little flair to his guitar solos, but not nearly the level of swagger I’m accustomed to seeing.

Got to admit, I was a little nervous when Jack and co went offstage after the regular set:

I started getting even more paranoid when I thought I heard the slightest hint of booing (probably me projecting).

But luckily they came back!

All in all a solid show, well worth the price of admission. It was TB’s very first Jack White show (and first show at Radio City!) and he really enjoyed it, saying “that’s just awesome” when Jack was on piano, and commenting how great of a musician he is. Success!

I’m pretty sure I saw Jack do this as he left the stage:


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