Paul Banks Documentary: You Had Me at “Paul Banks”

Play it on mute, play it with sound, any way you slice it, Interpol front-man Paul Banks is dreamy.

Here he is letting Noisey get the “behind-the-scenes” look into the making of his newest solo album, Banks (!!!!!)

You may remember Banks’s former solo project, Julian Plenti, which was laid to rest earlier this year after dying of mysterious causes.

The Perfect Hatewatch: Anne Hathaway Singing at Joe’s Pub

Does anyone have $100-300 that they’d like to give me for the sole purpose of having me produce the world’s greatest hatewatching review of a live musical performance? If so, please contact me, because this is a once in a lifetime opportunity for me to finally earn the title of Player Hater of the Year at the Player Haters’ Ball.

Anne Hathaway will be singing the songs of Kander and Ebb’s wartime Berlin musical, Cabaret, live in concert on October 24th at Joe’s Pub.

It’s the perfect hatewatching storm: Anne Hathaway + Broadway musical + live. And they named the thing “Perfectly Marvelous.” C’mon! They are simply asking for it!

Ok, sure the show is a benefit for the Public Theater’s new space — which indeed is a worthy cause — but we all know how this is going to go down. Lots of fake self-concious mugging and *serious* acting/singing moments.

Maybe she’ll bring out her friend James Franco:

Or maybe she’ll “apply the truth” of Sally Bowles, she’ll become a self-absorbed, completely oblivious performer … oh wait…
Continue reading “The Perfect Hatewatch: Anne Hathaway Singing at Joe’s Pub”

The Les Miz Movie Preview Proves to Be Everything Normal People Hate about Theater People

Sad, but true. I know it’s hard for these Hollywood actors to understand but PEOPLE HAVE SUNG LIVE WHILE BEING FILMED BEFORE. These people are talking so self-righteously, it’s like they just stole a loaf of bread to keep from starving or something:

Really Anne Hathaway? “There seemed to be something selfish about trying to go for the pretty version” — really? Doing a wimpy sob/speak Rex Harrison version of one of the greatest diva songs in musical theater is definitely way “less selfish” because you are “applying the truth to the melody”? OMG PUllleeaaasseeeezzzzzz. Get off your damn high horse and give the people what they want!

How many down-on-her-luck front-toothless prostitutes were really singing ballads right before they died of tuberculosis right before the start of the June Rebellion? If you want to be in a Les Miserables musical, I honestly cannot listen to your talk of “applying the truth.”

Says Hathaway about her character Fantine‘s state of mind while singing “I Dreamed a Dream”: “She’s literally at the bottom of a hole, realizing that she’s never going to climb out of this.”

That’s how I felt after watching that extended preview.

Too bad the Les Miz movie wasn’t something more like this:

or this:

Saw “The Master” This Weekend…Eh

So I saw The Master yesterday at Nitehawk in Williamsburg, BK while stuffing my face with Nitehawk queso, a Nitehawk burger with tots, and croquettes. (What? The movie was 2 hours and 15 minutes long — what did you want me to do, starve?)

Despite what you may have read on the internet, I did not see this movie because I was wooed by some arty trailer campaign, I saw it because of my love for Philip Seymour Hoffman (in the early 2000s, I may or may not have ran a PSH fan page), Jessie Plemons (LANDRY 4 EVA!), and Joaquin Phoenix. Although I liked There Will Be Blood (cell phone ringing in the theater and all), I’ve never been a huge Paul Thomas Anderson fan.

And after seeing The Master, I can’t say he’s won me over yet. Although many critics have gone gaga over the film, I’m in the camp of Richard Corless of “Time” magazine, who originally titled his review “There Will Be Boredom.” Although visually beautiful, with some great moments, but the film ultimately fell flat by the end of the film. Boooo.

Two thumbs indifferent.

Watch the trailer… if you must:

Nelly Furtado: Still Can Do No Wrong

My long-standing girl crush on Nelly Furtado has been renewed with the release of her new album, The Spirit Indestructible. She’s totally underrated by music critics for some reason (perhaps Randall Roberts of the LA Times is right — she’d get more buzz if her dad was a Sri Lankan rebel), but I’m always excited when this lady drops an album.

“Big Hoops” and “Bucket List” are already on my favorite’s playlist, as well as this little ditty, “Parking Lot”:

Sing it, girl!

VIDEO: Some British Dude Ruins “Last Nite” on X Factor UK

Hold me, I’m scared. Up until now I’ve been spared witnessing The Strokes being sung on one of those reality shows because most regular 18 year old Americans have no idea who the Strokes are other than “that band that the Killers really liked.” But unfortunately in Britain, it’s a different story, and last week a young lad by the name of “Eddie String” (nee the decidedly less rock ‘n’ roll Eddie Wilkinson) took to the “X Factor” stage in London and beat “Last Nite” into submission within inches of its life.

Surprisingly, the judges had nothing but positive things to say. Which only goes to show you, British people will fall for anything vaguely resembling the New York cool — they’ll even take a two-bit, scary tone-deaf version of it. One judge described him as “a little bit Mika, a little bit Russell Brand” — which I think was meant as a complement.

Witness the horror:

Charles and Ray Eames: User Experience Extraordinaires

If you are a mid-century furniture buff (or you just like watching Mad Men, visiting Apartment Therapy, or have a Pinterest account), you probably know the name Eames.

Or if you don’t know the name, you know the look:

Eames molded plastic chairs
via Herman Miller

Yup, that Eames.

Well if you are a bit of a neophyte, to furniture design such as I, what you may not have realized was the name Eames actually refers to two people – the husband and wife team of Charles and Ray Eames, who collaborated on nearly all the amazing design work for which they are known.

I recently watched the documentary Eames: The Architect and the Painter, which was an OK film — but what I found particularly interesting was some of the insights on their philosophy on how art and life are intertwined.

My knowledge of Eames design was limited to furniture, but over the course of the documentary I discovered that their contributions extended to far greater reaches.

Charles once said, “eventually, everything connects” — architecture, furniture, film, toys, photography, exhibitions — all of their work is tied together as part of the Eames experience. Eames the “brand” signified creativity, innovation, but most importantly there was no sense of elitism.

They believed in an egalitarian approach of wanting to bring the best, to the most, for the least (their partnership with Herman Miller was an example of that) — no doubt providing direct inspiration to companies like IKEA. Through their careers, they worked with the biggest companies of the day (IBM, the US Bicentennial Commission, even the US government itself, for the American National Exhibition in 1959 in Soviet Russia) on the most ambitious projects. They were creative powerhouses who never felt that they were “selling out” by working with the Man — it was simply the best way to bring joy and beauty to the widest audience possible.

Charles also once said that “design is the appropriate combination of materials in order to solve a problem,” and that’s what Eames design is all about — solving a problem, whether the problem is how to make a comfortable chair out of plywood, or how to convey the spirit of America in a sincere way to Russians during the Cold War. Consider the Eameses as user experience extraordinaires.

If anything, this film gave me a new appreciation for the Eames name and the thinking that went behind some of the greatest designs in the last 100 years.

Watch the trailer for “Eames: The Architect and the Painter”:

White Stripes First Ever Live Performance Vinyl to Be Released!!

File this under “amazing”:

Vault Package #13 also includes a red vinyl 7″ of the White Stripes first ever live performance recording from an open mic night at the Gold Dollar on July 14, 1997 and a tote bag featuring the iconic peppermint logo.

Relive the memories of Jack and Meg TOGETHER, with this clip from Under the Great White Northern Lights: